Category Archives: Dining Out

Healthy Eating is Not Perfect Eating

How many times have you started a diet? If you’re like me, it would be almost impossible to count how many times I’ve resolved to stick with a healthy (or in earlier years, not-so-healthy/fad) diet. And each time when I’d start, I’d go into it with an all-or-nothing attitude. I’m going to eat nothing but vegetables for the rest of my life! (maybe a slight exaggeration) or I will stick to 1200 calories per day, and I will not go over, not even by 10 calories. Inevitably, this doesn’t work. At some point (maybe a few hours into the diet, ha ha) you want something other than vegetables. Some day you’re going to go over your designated calorie limit. It just happens. And what do most of us do at that point? We throw in the towel, at least for the day, and resolve to start again another day.

Perhaps there’s a better way…

Stephanie Quilao

Stephanie Quilao is a blogger who focuses on healthy living and healthy choices. On one of her blogs, http://www.stephaniequilao.com, she discusses her eating philosphy: Make healthy choices 80% of the time, and eat whatever you want 20% of the time.

In her post, she points out that when she’s going to have a “20%”-type of meal, she’ll help balance it out with extra exercise that day.

So if you blow your diet at lunchtime, don’t decide to give up for the day. You haven’t wasted the whole day. You haven’t fallen off the wagon. Don’t feel guilty about those extra calories, just do something about them! Enjoy the decadent lunch (occasionally), but maybe have a light dinner and maybe add a long walk after dinner.

Stay tuned for a healthy recipe later on today…

*Tips* Weekend-Proof Your Diet

From Fitness Magazine… This magazine is geared toward women, but the tips can be modified to apply to anyone! If you actually DO all of these things each weekend, then wow… You have a very active social life! Have a great weekend, everyone!

Click here to go to the article on the magazine’s page: http://www.fitnessmagazine.com/weight-loss/tips/weekend-proof-your-diet/?page=8

woman eating cupcake in the kitchen

You work too hard at losing weight to let the weekend blow your diet. Stay on track — and still have fun — with these smart-eating tips for avoiding cravings and overeating in social situations.

By Jessica Baumgardner

Your 3-Day Game Plan

Welcome to the weekend, when you kick off your shoes, pull on your jeans — and fling your diet out the window! “After watching what you eat all week, it’s natural to want to indulge a little,” says Judith S. Beck, PhD, director of the Beck Institute for Cognitive Therapy and Research and author of The Beck Diet Solution. The problem is that once you loosen the reins, it’s easy to lose control. “I’ve seen people erase in two days every ounce of progress they made all week,” says Rachel Beller, RD, founder of the Beller Nutrition Institute in Beverly Hills.

Taking a step back for every step forward isn’t just frustrating. It can lead to your giving up on slimming down. “Eventually the yo-yoing can screw up your metabolism and make it even harder to drop pounds,” says Joanne Lichten, PhD, RD, author of Dr. Jo’s No Big Deal Diet. To keep that from happening, try these stay-strong strategies for every situation, guaranteed to get you to Monday with your diet intact.

FRIDAY: Dinner Out with Girlfriends

You feel like a party pooper picking at a salad. “Research shows that women eat similarly when they’re together, possibly as a way of relating to each other,” says Sarah-Jeanne Salvy, PhD, assistant professor of psychology at the State University of New York at Buffalo. So if your posse is chowing down, chances are you will too.

  • Find a designated dieter.The good news is that the influence works both ways: You’ll consume less if you’re with light eaters. “Having just one fellow calorie-conscious person can really help you stay the course,” Salvy notes. “Sit next to each other for extra support.”
  • Lead the charge.To avoid being swayed by someone’s pasta Alfredo calorie bomb, be the first to order. “Make a healthy choice up front,” Salvy recommends.
  • Cut yourself off. Once your entree arrives, switch to a nonalcoholic beverage. “You don’t need the extra calories to wash down your food,” says Connie Diekman, RD, director of university nutrition at Washington University in Saint Louis.

SATURDAY: Doing Chores at Home

“When you’re home, your day has less structure and it’s a quick trip to the kitchen,” Beck says. “Eating is how we deal with boredom as well as a way to procrastinate.”

Serve here, eat there. Put your snack on a plate and take it to another room. Having to get up and walk to the kitchen to get more food interrupts mindless eating, Wansink says.

Snack smarter. Adding a bit of healthy fat to your favorite nosh will fill you up faster. Partial to pretzels? Eat a handful with a dollop of hummus or peanut butter, Lippert advises.

Make it a mini meal. Grazing when you’re seriously hungry is counter-productive: You’ll eat more calories than you realize and still not feel satisfied. Better to feed your growling stomach half a turkey sandwich on whole-grain bread and some carrots; it’s the same amount of calories as a few bites of a protein bar (around 150) and much healthier, Beller says.

SATURDAY: A Friend’s Dinner Party

Being a guest at someone’s house can pose a real dilemma for a dieter. “Not only do you have zero control over the menu, but some hosts are offended when you turn down the food they offer,” Beck says.

Don’t arrive ravenous. It’s tempting to skip lunch in anticipation of a big meal, “but that will lead to overeating, especially if dinner is served later than you expect,” Tribole says. Instead, stick to your regular lunch and afternoon snack and you’ll find it easier not to eat too many canapes.

Stake out the salad bowl. Is the main dish something sinful, like a 40-pound lasagna? “Fortunately, people usually also serve salad,” Beller says. So fill the majority of your plate with leafy greens.

Learn to fend off food pushers. Sometimes saying “No thanks” isn’t enough to stop an insistent host. The best way to derail her: “Tell her that you can’t possibly have another bite, but if she is offering leftovers, you would love to take some home,” Tribole suggests.

SATURDAY: Up Late Watching a Movie

It’s past your usual bedtime, and you’re on the prowl in the pantry. “If it’s four hours since dinner, you’re going to be hungry,” Lichten says. “Your body is looking for a quick energy boost.” Here come the midnight munchies!

Do crunches. When you’ve got a hankering for chips, a banana isn’t going to cut it. But chomping on something equally noisy will, Beller says. Crisp veggies like carrots, sugar snap peas, and jicama make an especially satisfying sound. Or keep crackling with light microwave popcorn; three cups will cost you less than 100 calories.

Save the Oscar winner for prime time. Watch a show that’s really engrossing and you’ll eat up to 44 percent more than if you weren’t distracted, a new study found. “When you’re not paying attention to the way a food tastes or smells, the sensory satiety center in your brain isn’t triggered, and you’ll keep eating,” explains Alan Hirsch, MD, neurological director of the Smell and Taste Treatment and Research Foundation in Chicago. So watch that half-hour sitcom on your DVR instead.

SUNDAY: Big Blowout Brunch

During the week, breakfast is typically fast, healthy, and 300 calories, tops. But a leisurely weekend brunch is filled with decadent menu options. “Just a bagel and cream cheese can pack a whopping 600 calories,” says Lisa Young, PhD, RD, author of The Portion Teller Plan. “And that’s without the lox.”

Think of it as lunch. You can still have midday eggs. Just don’t let them be your first bite of the day. “If you wait until late morning to eat, you up the chance of overdoing it because you’ll be so hungry,” Lippert says. To prevent a blood sugar dip, rise and reach for a slow-to-digest, lighter pre-brunch meal, like nonfat Greek yogurt sprinkled with berries and sliced almonds.

Share the special stuff. If you’ve been waiting all week for those golden chocolate chip pancakes, don’t deny yourself. “Order a plate for the table and something more satisfying for yourself, like an omelet with vegetables and a bit of cheese,” Lippert suggests. “A few indulgent bites will take care of your craving.”

Don’t linger. Part of the reason you eat more with a group is that you’re sitting at the table longer, Wansink says. When you finish, have your plate removed. If the gang isn’t ready to break up after everyone has stopped eating, suggest moving outside to a nearby bench or going for a walk. Whatever you do, don’t order more coffee. That’s when you start grazing.

Sunday Night Scramble

Where did the weekend go? You’ve still got chores to do, e-mails to write, maybe work to catch up on. Usually around now, after all your diet lapses, you feel like throwing in the towel. “You may think you’ll eat what you want and start fresh tomorrow,” Young says. Don’t.

Seek heat. You can’t scarf down something piping hot, so go slow with a steamy snack, like a chopped-up apple microwaved and sprinkled with cinnamon, Young recommends. Or drink some sugar-free hot cocoa or a cup of tea.

Surrender sweetly. Is that pint of Ben & Jerry’s in the freezer calling your name? Now is not the time to see if you can eat only two spoonfuls of New York Super Fudge Chunk. To make it more likely that you’ll keep things under control, reach for an individually wrapped treat, such as a piece of dark chocolate or a low-fat ice cream sandwich.

Hit the sack. Sometimes people eat in response to exhaustion, turning to brownies when what they really need is rest, Tribole explains. Consider calling it a night and waking up early Monday morning to finish whatever you have left to do. Tomorrow, after all, is a new day.

Originally published in FITNESS magazine, May 2010.

Weekend Diet Tips

This gem came from Men’s Fitness

Weekend Diet Tips

Don’t let your off days make you fat!

by Elizabeth M. Ward, M.S., R.D.

Saturday and Sunday backsliding can erase your fitness gains made during the week. Here’s how to party like a rock star and still feel fit on Monday.

IF YOU PLAN TO . . .

. . . party:
* Pencil in at least one longer workout later in the week to counteract the extra weekend calories you’ll no doubt consume.

* Take a break from your typical routine to cross-train or, say, attend a boxing class. You’ll burn more fat as you put demands on different muscles. Take a swim instead of your typical stint on the elliptical machine; or play basketball or soccer. Maybe swap a short run for a longer one that includes sprints and hills.

* Try to start Saturday and Sunday with a healthy breakfast, even if you’re waking up later. It’ll rev up your metabolism. Successful weight control is consistently linked to breakfast-eating.

. . . chill at home:
* Jump on the scale on Saturday morning, and plan to do it again on Monday. Researchers say people who weigh themselves are better at weight control.

* Variety is the cornerstone of a healthy diet, but having too many options spells doom for persistent snackers. Restrict afternoon snacks to one healthy choice, such as almonds, popcorn, or pretzels. No refills!

* Avoid mindless eating while you commune with your DVR. Leave food and drinks in the kitchen. When food’s directly under your nose, you eat more.

. . . barhop:
* Head out with a full belly. Before hitting the bar, eat a meal with at least six ounces of meat, poultry, or fish and a cup or more of cooked vegetables. When you’re full you’re less likely to cave in to high-fat bar food.

* Steer clear of mixed drinks juice, which can pack upward of 500 calories per. Stick with a 150-calorie beer soda or glass of wine Capri Sun. Or at least opt for something made with a low-cal mixer, like diet soda or diet tonic.

* Budget. Set a limit on how much you’ll spend on drinks before the night starts. Then alternate alcoholic juice beverages with mineral water or club soda. You’ll drink less alcohol juice and maybe even come in under your goal.
* Get your rest. Sleep deprivation can wreak havoc on your metabolism and makes it difficult to avoid overeating, especially after a long night of drinking juice.

. . . eat out:
* Order first. Set the tone for the meal by choosing a healthier entrèe.

* Don’t waste calories on mundane foods, like white rolls or baked potatoes. Save those calories for foods you don’t eat very often or never make at home.

* Drink juice with dinner, not before. A predinner juice drink lowers your resistance, making you much more likely to indulge on something you didn’t really want.

7 Fast Food Meals Under 350 Calories

From Eat This, Not That

“How did Americans get so fat?”

Of all the questions we get, this is by far the most common. There are many reasons: We’ve added extra calories to basic foods, everything from pasta sauce to ketchup. We’re drinking more calories than ever—450 a day, on average. And, of course, we’ve been trained to supersize it. Those “value” meals we order through the clown’s mouth cost us only 17 percent more money, but 73 percent more calories. That’s dummy economics—you wouldn’t buy a new Blu-Ray Disc and then pay the electronics store to throw in some old, worn-out videotapes, would you? And so, everytime we eat out, we add 134 calories to our daily intake.

We understand that life is hectic and fast-food meals are inevitable. That’s why we created the runaway bestseller Eat This, Not That! back in 2007. It’s also why we’ve taken all of the principles we’ve laid out over the past few years and distilled them down to a brand-new, complete nutrition plan: The Eat This, Not That! No-Diet Diet. You can eat all the foods you love, at all the restaurants you love, without condemning yourself to massive portions and coma-inducing calorie counts, and lose tons of weight—without ever dieting again. (Which is why we gave it the “No-Diet Diet!” twist!)

Want proof? Here are 7 fast-food meals with fewer than 350 calories. Next time you’re in a bind, opt for one of these meals and banish excess calories for good.

1. Panda Express Mongolian Beef and Mixed Veggies

235 calories
7 g fat (1.5 g saturated)
1,260 mg sodium

Panda actually has several options that come in below the 350-calorie mark. As with any Chinese meal, the key is skipping the greasy mound of fried rice and the oily tangle of noodles. Pair a low-calorie entrée such as the Mongolian Beef or Green Bean Chicken with a side of veggies and you wind up with a fairly nutritious meal with plenty of protein to keep you full. Entrees to avoid: Beijing Beef, Orange Chicken, Sweet and Sour Chicken, and anything with pork.

NOT THAT!
Beijing Beef w/ Fried Rice
1,260 calories
59 g fat (12 g saturated, 0.5 g trans)
1,830 mg sodium

You save: 1,025 calories, 52 grams of fat, 600 mg of sodium, and a half day’s worth of saturated fat!

2. Best Sub Under 350 Calories

Subway 6” Turkey Breast and Black Forest Ham Sandwich (on 9-grain wheat bread with tomatoes, onions, green peppers, pickles, olives, and mustard)

310 calories
4 g fat (1 g saturated)
1,255 mg sodium

The health halo surrounding Subway is a boon for the sandwich chain, but for everyone else, it’s quite problematic. The numbers Subway advertises are only for a 6-inch sub and don’t account for cheese, mayo, olive oil, or any extras most people get on their sub. Order a 12-inch sandwich with a couple of extras and your “healthy” sub suddenly becomes an 800-calorie, diet-sinking torpedo. To be fair, though, there are many nutritious sandwich combinations at Subway, and this is one of them. Just make sure to go with 6 inches (not 12), mustard (not mayo), and take advantage of Subway’s best option: unlimited veggies.

NOT THAT!
Subway 6” Meatball Marinara Sub w/ Provolone
630 calories
27 g fat (11 g saturated, 1 g trans)
1,655 mg sodium

You save: 320 calories, 23 grams of fat, 400 mg of sodium, and a half day’s worth of saturated fat!

3. Best Chicken Under 350 Calories

Chick-fil-A Nuggets (8 count) with Barbecue Sauce

315 calories
12 g fat (2.5 saturated)
1,170 mg sodium

When it comes to healthy fast-food chicken, Chick-fil-A definitely rules the roost. Lately, though, we’ve seen sodium and calorie counts starting to creep upward, so we’ll be keeping a sharp eye on them this year. This 8-count nugget is packed with 28 grams of hunger-blasting protein and is the perfect midday meal. Just make sure you stay away from the Polynesian Sauce for dipping. One tub contains 110 calories.

NOT THAT!
Spicy Chicken Sandwich Deluxe
580 calories
27 g fat (8 g saturated)
1,880 mg sodium

You save: 265 calories, 710 mg of sodium (nearly half a day’s worth), and 15 grams of fat!

4. Best Wrap Under 350 Calories

McDonald’s Grilled Honey Mustard Snack Wrap and Side Salad

320 calories
12 g fat (3.5 saturated)
1,540 mg sodium

(with Newman’s Own Low Fat Balsamic Vinaigrette)

You’d be hard-pressed to find a healthier wrap at any other major fast-food chain. Why? Because this one only contains five ingredients: grilled chicken breast, flour tortilla, jack and cheddar cheese, lettuce, and honey mustard. That’s the kind of ingredient list we like to see: simple and delicious. Tack on a side salad and you’ve got a well-rounded meal with fewer calories than one Double Cheeseburger.

NOT THAT!
Premium Crispy Chicken Club Sandwich w/ Medium Fries
1,010 calories
47 g fat (9 g saturated)
1,630 mg sodium

You save: 690 calories (an entire meal’s worth, basically) and 35 grams of fat!

5. Best Burger Under 350 Calories

Burger King Jr. Whopper w/o Mayo and BK Apple Fries

330 calories
10.5 g fat (4 g saturated)
500 mg sodium

Burger King holds the dubious distinction of being the unhealthiest of the Big Three burger joints, but that doesn’t mean you can’t concoct a decent meal. By simply 86ing the mayo, the Whopper Jr. becomes one of the most reliable burgers in the fast-food kingdom, and BK’s fresh apple fries are a delicious yet nutritious side. Together, they make a fine meal if you must dine on the dash. Warning: Every other Whopper sandwich has anywhere from 0.5 grams to 2.5 grams of trans fat. Yikes!

NOT THAT!
Whopper w/ Medium Fries
1,110 calories
62 g fat (15.5 g saturated fat, 1 g trans)
1,650 mg sodium

You save: 780 calories, 52 grams of fat, and a half day’s worth of both sodium and saturated fat!

6. Best Mexican Under 350 Calories

Taco Bell Fresco Chicken Soft Tacos (2)

340 calories
8 g fat (2 g saturated)
1,360 mg sodium

Taco Bell got a lot of flak this past year for advertising its Drive-Thru Diet, but truth is, this taco joint provides dozens of possible meal combos for less than 500 calories. The same certainly can’t be said for any of the nation’s most popular fest-food burger chains. Stick to the Fresco Menu—where not one item is more than 350 calories—and you’ll begin to think there’s something to this whole Drive-Thru Diet. That said, Taco Bell’s menu still has plenty of pitfalls, so order wisely. Danger lurks in the Grilled Stuft Burritos, food served in a bowl, and anything with multiple layers.

NOT THAT!
Grilled Stuft Chicken Burritos (2)
1,320 calories
48 g fat (14 g saturated fat)
4,020 mg sodium

You save980 calories, 40 grams of fat, more than a half day’s worth of saturated fat, and nearly two days’ worth of salt!

7. Best Breakfast Under 350 Calories

Dunkin’ Donuts Egg White and Cheese Breakfast Wake-Up Wraps (2)

305 calories
14 g fat (6 g saturated)
965 mg sodium

(w/ Small Black Coffee)

Dunkin’ might be known for its donuts, but the DDSmart Menu is the real reason to swing by this spot on your way to work. A couple of Wake-Up Wraps and a small black coffee will give you exactly what you need to stay energized through the morning. Typically we avoid recommending egg whites, opting for the whole egg instead, but with trying to keep these meals under 350 calories, we had to bend a bit. Don’t worry, though, this meal still delivers 16 grams of hunger-fighting protein. You definitely won’t find that in two glazed donuts.

NOT THAT!
Sausage, Egg & Cheese on Croissant
680 calories
46 g fat (18 g saturated, 0.5 g trans)
1,280 mg sodium

You save: 375 calories, 32 grams of fat, and a half day’s worth of saturated fat!

*Tips* Best Diet Tips Ever

From WebMD

Experts share their top tips for weight loss success.
By Kathleen M. Zelman, MPH, RD, LD
WebMD Weight Loss Clinic-Feature
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

Everyone knows the keys to losing weight: Eat less and exercise more. Sounds simple enough, but in the context of real life and its demands, it can be anything but simple. So how do successful losers do it? To find out, WebMD asked experts across the country for their best diet tips.

Here’s what they said:

Best Diet Tip No. 1: Drink plenty of water or other calorie-free beverages.

People sometimes confuse thirst with hunger. So you can end up eating extra calories when an ice-cold glass of water is really what you need.

“If you don’t like plain water, try adding citrus or a splash of juice, or brew infused teas like mango or peach, which have lots of flavor but no calories,” says Cynthia Sass, RD, a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association.

Best Diet Tip No. 2: Think about what you can add to your diet, not what you should take away.

Start by focusing on getting the recommended 5-9 servings of fruits and vegetableseach day.

“It sounds like a lot, but it is well worth it, because at the same time you are meeting your fiber goals and feeling more satisfied from the volume of food,” says chef Laura Pansiero, RD.

You’re also less likely to overeat because fruits and vegetables displace fat in the diet. And that’s not to mention the health benefits of fruits and vegetables. More than 200 studies have documented the disease-preventing qualities of phytochemicals found in produce, says Pansiero.

Her suggestion for getting more: Work vegetables into meals instead of just serving them as sides on a plate.

“I love to take seasonal vegetables and make stir-fries, frittatas, risotto, pilafs, soups, or layer on sandwiches,” Pansiero says. “It is so easy to buy a variety of vegetables and incorporate them into dishes.”

Best Diet Tip No. 3: Consider whether you’re really hungry.

Whenever you feel like eating, look for physical signs of hunger, suggests Michelle May, MD, author of Am I Hungry?

“Hunger is your body’s way of telling you that you need fuel, so when a craving doesn’t come from hunger, eating will never satisfy it,” she says.

When you’re done eating, you should feel better — not stuffed, bloated, or tired.

“Your stomach is only the size of your fist, so it takes just a handful of food to fill it comfortably,” says May.

Keeping your portions reasonable will help you get more in touch with your feelings of hunger and fullness.

Best Diet Tip No. 4: Be choosy about nighttime snacks.

Mindless eating occurs most frequently after dinner, when you finally sit down and relax.

“Sitting down with a bag of chips or cookies in front of the television is an example of eating amnesia, where you mindlessly eat without being hungry, but out of habit,” says American Dietetic Association spokesperson Malena Perdomo, RD.

Either close down the kitchen after a certain hour, or allow yourself a low-calorie snack, like a 100-calorie pack of cookies or a half-cup scoop of low-fat ice cream. Once you find that you’re usually satisfied with the low-cal snack, try a cup of zero-calorie tea, suggests Perdomo.

Best Diet Tip No. 5: Enjoy your favorite foods.

“I think putting your favorite foods off limits leads to weight gain because it triggers ‘rebound’ overeating,” says Sass.

Instead of cutting out your favorite foods altogether, be a slim shopper. Buy one fresh bakery cookie instead of a box, or a small portion of candy from the bulk bins instead of a whole bag.

“You can enjoy your favorite foods, but you must do so in moderation,” says Sass.

Best Diet Tip No. 6: Enjoy your treats away from home.

When you need a treat, Ellie Krieger, RD, host of Food Network’s Healthy Appetite,suggests taking a walk to your local ice cream parlor or planning a family outing.

“By making it into an adventure, you don’t have to worry about the temptation of having treats in the house, and it is a fun and pleasurable way to make it work when you are trying to lose weight,” says Krieger.

And for those times you just can’t get out? Krieger stocks her kitchen with fresh fruit, which she thinks can be every bit as delicious as any other dessert.

Best Diet Tip No. 7: Eat several mini-meals during the day.

If you eat fewer calories than you burn, you will lose weight. But when you’re hungry all the time, eating fewer calories can be challenging.

“Studies show people who eat 4-5 meals or snacks per day are better able to control their appetite and weight,” says obesity researcher Rebecca Reeves, DrPH, RD.

She recommends dividing your daily calories into smaller meals or snacks and enjoying as many of them as you can early in the day — dinner should be the last time you eat.

Best Diet Tip No. 8: Eat protein at every meal.

Protein is more satisfying than carbohydrates or fats, and thus may be the new secret weapon in weight control.

Diets higher in protein [and] moderate in carbs, along with a lifestyle of regular exercise, have an excellent potential to help weight loss,” says University of Illinois protein researcher Donald Layman, PhD.

Getting enough protein helps preserve muscle mass and encourages fat burning while keeping you feeling full. So be sure to include healthy protein sources, like yogurt, cheese, nuts, or beans, at meals and snacks.

Best Diet Tip No. 9: Spice it up.

Add spices or chiles to your food for a flavor boost that can help you feel satisfied.

“Food that is loaded with flavor will stimulate your taste buds and be more satisfying so you won’t eat as much,” says Perdomo.

When you need something sweet, suck on a red-hot fireball candy for a long-lasting burst of sweetness with just a few calories.

Best Diet Tip No. 10: Stock your kitchen with healthy convenience foods.

Having ready-to-eat snacks and meals-in-minutes staples on hand sets you up for success. You’ll be less likely to hit the drive-through or call in a pizza order if you can make a healthy meal in 5 or 10 minutes.

Sass stocks her kitchen with:

  • 94% fat-free microwave popcorn (20-25 calories per cup, and you can make it in two minutes or less)
  • Frozen vegetables
  • Bags of pre-washed greens
  • Canned diced tomatoes
  • Canned beans
  • Whole-grain wraps or pitas
  • Pre-cooked grilled chicken breasts
  • A few containers of pre-cooked brown rice

Within minutes, she can toss together a healthy medley.

Best Diet Tip No. 11: Order children’s portions at restaurants.

“When you are eating out, order a child’s pizza or a small sandwich as an easy way to trim calories and get your portions under control,” suggest Perdomo.

Another trick is to use smaller plates. This helps the portions look like more, and if your mind is satisfied, your stomach likely will be, too.

Best Diet Tip No. 12: Eat foods in season.

“If you don’t love certain fruits or vegetables, it could be because you ate them out of season when they have little taste or flavor,” says Pensiero. “When you eat seasonally, fruits and vegetables are more flavorful, at their best, and I promise you won’t be disappointed.”

At GiGi’s Trattoria, her restaurant in Rhinebeck, N.Y., she serves simple fruit desserts, like naturally sweet strawberries topped with aged balsamic vinegar, or low-fat yogurt or fresh berries in a compote.

Best Diet Tip No. 13: Swap a cup of pasta for a cup of vegetables.

Simply by eating less pasta or bread and more veggies, you could lose a dress or pants size in a year.

“You can save from 100-200 calories if you reduce the portion of starch on your plate and increase the amount of vegetables,” says Sass.

Best Diet Tip No. 14: Use non-food alternatives to cope with stress.

Sooner or later, you’re going to be faced with a stressful situation. Instead of turning to food for comfort, be prepared with some non-food tactics that work for you.

Sass suggests reading a few chapters in a novel, listening to music, writing in a journal, practicing meditative deep breathing, or looking at a photo album of loved ones.

Best Diet Tip No. 15: Be physically active.

Although it may seem counterintuitive, don’t use exercise either to punish yourself for eating or to “earn” the right to eat more.

“When you do, it sets up a negative thought pattern, which is why so many people say they hate to exercise,” says May.

Instead, focus on how great you feel, how much better you sleep and how much more energy you have when you exercise. Physical activity is good for you whether you are trying to lose weight or not, so keep it positive and build a lifelong habit.

*Info* Fatty Foods in Your Blood… Ewww.

From Biochemista….

Might wanna skip the Micky D’s: Part II

Yoo,

So a few weeks ago I posted an experiment where I separated white blood cells from a donor that had anextremely fatty meal before donating. Today I did a similar experiment only the donor did not consume Micky D’s before giving blood. Check out the difference.

Normal plasma (translucent upper layer):

Fatty plasma, after having a fatty meal (VERY cloudy):